Contents
  1. Factionalism and Robert Mugabe’s Leadership in Zimbabwe
  2. Dinner With Mugabe: The Untold Story Of A Freedom Fighter Who Became A Tyrant
  3. DINNER WITH MUGABE – The untold story of a freedom fighter who became a tyrant
  4. Robert Mugabe

”Dinner with Mugabe” er en skildring af Robert Mugabes liv. Heidi. Holland har besøgt flere af hans gamle bekendte, venner og fami- liemedlemmer for at få. 'REVIEW: DINNER WITH MUGABE'. CONCERNED AFRICA SCHOLARS. BULLETIN N°80 - WINTER Review: Heidi Holland's Dinner with. Mugabe. Holland's tireless investigation begins with her having dinner with Mugabe the freedom fighter Download an Afrikaans article in PDF format from Die Burger.

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Dinner With Mugabe Pdf

Dinner With Mugabe book. Read 57 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. This penetrating, timely portrait of Robert Mugabe is the psycho. DINNER WITH MUGABE. The untold story of a freedom fighter who became a tyrant. Heidi Holland. PENGUIN BOOKS. UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. UNIVERSITY. opvibpaberland.cf: Dinner With Mugabe: The Untold Story of a Freedom Fighter Who Became a Tyrant (): Heidi Holland, Deidre Rubenstein: Books.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

Machel gave him a house in Quelimane although kept him under partial house arrest , with Mugabe requiring permission to travel. Let us blow up his citadel. Let us give him no time to rest. Let us chase him in every corner. Let us rid our home of this settler vermin". He was angry with the latter's secret attempts to negotiate with Smith. Vorster , Smith accepted in principle that white minority rule could not be prolonged indefinitely.

He oversaw the general election which resulted in Abel Muzorewa , a politically moderate black bishop, being elected Prime Minister of the reconstituted Zimbabwe Rhodesia. Mugabe himself was unharmed. At the time Walls refused.

Factionalism and Robert Mugabe’s Leadership in Zimbabwe

People are being terrorised. The book is a description of life told by Soweto's residents. It is also illustrated. Holland explores the peaceful and violent protestations of the political party against racial discrimination. She also looks at the communist ties of the party as well as the roots of apartheid ideology. The book received favourable reviews, with The New York Times citing it as a 'concise' and 'informative' history of the political party. Holland criticized comments made by Helen Zille about the president, Jacob Zuma , in the article 'A disservice to white citizens' published by The Star on 21 May Holland said that Zille's possibly prejudiced criticism of Zuma, for allegedly endangering his wives by repeatedly having sex with an HIV-positive woman, had reflected badly on the white South African community.

On 27 May , the newspaper published Zille's reply. Plenty to think of and reflect on. The book is well-written and a good read. Because I disagree with her assessment of Mugabe means that I think she concentrated on some parts of his life and ignored others to prove her thesis, even if this was done unconsciously.

However it was her book, Heidi Holland's book, not mine. A 5 star read. View all 12 comments.

Dinner With Mugabe: The Untold Story Of A Freedom Fighter Who Became A Tyrant

While I'm reading books like Dinner with Mugabe to remedy that fact, my lack of embarrassingly enough even basic knowledge in many cases made it difficult for me to connect to several of the events that Holland uses to examine Robert Mugabe. The purpose of the book was not so much to describe how Mugabe affected Zimbabwe for the worse Holland, and probably most others not in ZANU-PF, take for granted that he did , but rather to use psychology to examine how it was he made such decisions.

Essentially, Holland wonders "[How did: What drove his self-destruction" and, as a result, the destruction of Zimbabwe. She concludes that it was the childhood influences of his mother and the local Jesuit priest believing too much in his future that made it impossible for him to tolerate rejection. Similarly, his awful experiences with the white regime in Rhodesia, especially when he wasn't allowed to go to the funeral of his infant son, made him too angry to resist revenge.

Likewise, what he views as later betrayals by whites in Zimbabwe and by Britain and America fueled that need to seek revenge. And finally, the effect of those around him kow-towing to his every wish and whim eventually made him "succumb to his power lust as well as to retribution rather than serving Zimbabwe in the best interests of the people who once idolized him" I applaud Holland's efforts in creating this psychological study.

I believe that she did a solid job of it--probably as best as one would manage given the circumstances. I also appreciated the re-evaluation of this effect on Zimbabwe in the postscript given the supposed "power-sharing" agreement that was decided upon in September of The problem is not in the conclusion, per se, but rather in her relentless beating of it throughout the book.

DINNER WITH MUGABE – The untold story of a freedom fighter who became a tyrant

Obviously Mugabe and those close to him would not be reliable, and she notes this, but otherwise it seems to be taken for granted that the majority of her interviews are from reliable or semi-reliable sources. In the postscript she claims that Britain has a prerogative to speak respectfully not necessarily appeasing towards Mugabe to try and broker some kind of relief for his people, which I agree with--diplomacy is the best option nine times out of ten, but beyond that there's nothing.

How should we respond to dictators in established dictatorships, like in Myanmar? Or to the newly formed heads of state in younger states?

Or what about the variety of tribal chiefdoms in Somalia? Regardless of my problems with the book, I think it was an interesting character study that did humanize "Mad Bob" but not in a way that condoned or excused away the atrocities that he explicitly or implicitly endorsed.

Made me want to learn more about Zimbabwe, at least. Mar 03, Mutugi Mutegi rated it it was ok. A most agonising read for me. Never before have I actually pushed myself to read a book that I admittedly found repulsive at several points. The only pro among so many cons was the actual interviews with key persons in Zim's history and Mugabe's life. That notwithstanding, the reduction of these interviews into superficial and almost nagging "psychological" evaluations without much significant personal encounters with Mugabe seemed overbearing to me.

It gets to a point where one almost feels l A most agonising read for me.

It gets to a point where one almost feels like the author is "trying too much", over-reaching and insisting on matters that otherwise shouldn't get such a spotlight.

The author does admit that the book she wrote has a "Eurocentric" view, which I gladly is more nuanced than expected. But for a book that seemed to have so much promise of knowledge and insight, I was left wishing that it was a mere collection of the interviews themselves with none of the author's presumably informed commentary.

View 1 comment. Aug 07, Andrea added it. And this is why not everyone should be published. This book read like a school kid trying to make a story fit their image. I thought it would be an insightful view of the murderer and despot who has destroyed a country in the name of his gluttony for power, and all I got was some lilly livered person putting across a very shallow piece.

Certainly not an author I would want to read anything else by. May 06, Tim rated it really liked it Shelves: I found the insights into Mugabe's character fascinating, in particular how dangerous it turned out to be for his Mother and Jesuit teachers to have told him he was chosen by god. But the book didn't flow very well, and I recall losing interest about two thirds of the way through, although I did finish. Not "a book I couldn't put down", but an interesting one nonetheless. View all 4 comments.

Dec 21, Sipho rated it liked it Shelves: Who is Robert Mugabe? How and why did he become the person he now infamously is? The author bookends this work with the two occasions that she met Robert Mugabe.

The first encounter was in , the young Mugabe fresh out of an 11 year stint in jail under the Rhodesian government. She remembers him as well mannered, well spoken and even compassionate. In between her next meeting with Mugabe - in a i Who is Robert Mugabe? In between her next meeting with Mugabe - in a interview - much has changed in the country formerly known as Rhodesia.

Mugabe has become a seemingly megalomaniac dictator presiding over a country deep in the throes of economic and political crises. What happened? Not so much what happened to Zimbabwe although that cannot be divorced from the apparent changes in the demeanour, temperament and disposition of its leader , but what happened to the Robert Mugabe of the 70's and 80's?

The author interviews a range of people who have known Mugabe at different stages of his life: Each provide different insights from about the motivations of Mugabe from their unique vantage point.

Holland does a good job of informing the reader of the potential biases that each of her interviewees hold. As usual, the truth about Mugabe probably lies somewhere in the middle. This book, for me, fell short in several respects.

Firstly, and most annoyingly, Holland's persistent psycho-analysis feels misplaced and inaccurate. She seems to have already decided that Mugabe's childhood, bookish disposition and inability to form close bonds and traumatic experiences as a prisoner of war are the real reasons behind his aggression toward the West and his inability to compromise.

Any evidence suggesting otherwise is dismissed with puerile arguments. Secondly, while Holland rightfully exposes some of the potential biases of her subjects, she fails to acknowledge her own. Perhaps her first quick but pleasant encounter with Mugabe in was not an accurate depiction of the man he already was?

Has she hinged too much of her thesis on this one encounter? That said, Dinner With Mugabe is worth reading - albeit with several pinches of salt - for an understanding of Mugabe's reputation within his country and without. In light of recent developments in Zimbabwe, I sincerely hope Robert Mugabe finds time to pen his memoirs so we have his version of events. Sep 07, Leo Passaportis rated it really liked it.

The real value in this book is in the comprehensive selection of interview material which the author has collected through dedicated research, patience and dogged determination.

HH travels between South Africa, Zimbabwe and the UK in the main to interview key people who were either close to Mugabe or close to events which involved the man. The excerpts from interviews with Dennis Norman, Lord and Lady Soames, and Edgar Tekere come to mind as being particularly revelatory to me. There's really qu The real value in this book is in the comprehensive selection of interview material which the author has collected through dedicated research, patience and dogged determination.

There's really quite a lot of interview material to digest let alone opinion. HH's attempts to get under the skin of the man are admirable. She consults a few psychologists and alludes to theories by prominent psychoanalysts like Freud, viz-a-vis personality splitting and repression of emotions. However she does have a tendency to go over the same ground in succeeding chapters. Fortunately this is subordinate to the volume of interview material.

In her final analysis she suggests giving Mugabe some respect when trying to engage with the man through dialogue which I commend her for. It is evident that Mugabe really does believe in an almost messianic mission to stand up to British Imperialism in all its forms.

Robert Mugabe

A two-way dialogue between the West and Mugabe would go a long way to creating a viable route forwards. It's not too late. As it stands it is very sad the lengths Mugabe has gone to in order to try and send home this message. Very sad indeed. Dec 26, Kim Wong rated it liked it Shelves: In a carefully researched book, Heidi Holland attempts to understand how someone upon whom so many had placed their hopes and dreams became a symbol for African kleptocracy.

Holland traces Robert Mugabe's life as far as the information can take her, from Mugabe's home town and tight-lipped family to influential former colleagues in the rebellion whom Mugabe ultimately supplanted and who have their own agendas to Ian Smith and represents of the British government who underestimated or misundersto In a carefully researched book, Heidi Holland attempts to understand how someone upon whom so many had placed their hopes and dreams became a symbol for African kleptocracy.

Holland traces Robert Mugabe's life as far as the information can take her, from Mugabe's home town and tight-lipped family to influential former colleagues in the rebellion whom Mugabe ultimately supplanted and who have their own agendas to Ian Smith and represents of the British government who underestimated or misunderstood Mugabe. Holland is even able to interview Mugabe himself, albeit briefly. Given the effort involved, it's disappointing that Holland's psychological profile of Mugabe is so pedestrian.

Mugabe, according to Holland, was a lonely boy who had too heavy expectations placed upon him from childhood. He was unprepared for the brutality of internecine fighting in the rebellion to free Rhodesia from white rule or for the torture he experienced during his imprisonment. Once in power, Mugabe was corrupted, and he became the crook he is today. Those hoping for a challenge to their assumptions or new insight into Mugabe would be disappointed, but it's a well written and researched book.

Jul 21, Elliot Ratzman rated it liked it.

Does the ego of dictators follow logic? None ever turn inward and blame himself for the violence and corruption of his regime but blames the media, saboteurs and enemies. How does one get to be a dictator?

Do childhood experiences set the authoritarian personality?

This book is a series of interviews: Oct 22, Georgie rated it it was ok Shelves:

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